Category Archives: CreativeDestruction

KDE Akademy 2014 – Welcome, new KDE board!

Akademy 2014 is still in full swing in Brno in the Czech Republic with the traditional hack week that started on Monday. At about 200 participants it was well attended and organized. This years conference will very likely mark a milestone of change for KDE – a new board was elected, and a strategy discussion was started that will affect the direction and development of the KDE community for a decent amount of time. When I traveled home from Akademy 2014 on the train from Brno to Berlin, I personally felt a sense of satisfaction, because the community has managed to steer clear of the dangers of bike shedding about the board succession, and is accepting the change imposed by a shifting environment as a positive force.

Akademy 2014

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The KDE Randa 2014 meeting, in easy-digestible video format!

In case you were wondering what was going on in Randa, here are some first hand impressions. The video was produced by Françoise Wybrecht (alias Morgane Marquis) and Lucie Robin, and the people in it are the actual participants of the event. It was also created using KDenlive, one of the awesome Free Software tools a team has been working on at the Randa meeting itself. The video introduces the faces and personalities of the contributors and their different backgrounds and origins. Many thanks to our brand new ad-hoc media team for producing this video!

(In case the embedded video does not show up, see here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yua6M9jqoEk)

How to contribute to the KDE Frameworks Cookbook

The annual KDE Randa Meeting, in itself already shock-ful of awesome, this year hosted the KDE Frameworks Cookbook sprint. Valorie, Cornelius and I already wrote a lot about it. Plenty of attention went into finding the place for the cookbook between the getting-started HOWTOs on KDE Techbase and the full-blown API documentation. Not surprisingly, there is a space and a good purpose for the book. Frameworks developers and maintainer have had to deal with the question of where to put introductions that segue newcomers into how to use the modules many times, and so far, the answer have been unsatisfactory. Newcomers only find the API documentation when they already know about a framework, and TechBase is a great resource for developers, but not necessarily a good introduction. What is missing is a good way to help and learn about what KDE Frameworks have to offer. So there is the purpose of the KDE Frameworks Cookbook – to help developers find and learn about the right tools for the problems they need to solve (and also, consumable on a e-book reader by the pool). For developers and maintainers, this means they need to know how to add sections to the book that cover this information about their frameworks. These tools and workflows will be explained in this post. Continue reading

Friday at Endocode. This time, it is wine o’clock.

It is Friday, it is 4pm. In German, it would be “Bier Uhr”. Beer o’clock, in English. However, since the nice folks of ownCloud left us a bottle of wine after having their latest development sprint in our office, we decided to call it wine o’clock this week. With Hugo Roy we have a proper frenchman visiting our Berlin offices at the moment, he approves.

Wine o’clock at Endocode
Wine o’clock at Endocode

Notice how the Endocode branded wall decoration matches the ownCloud logo. Pure concidence, of course. Thanks and à votre santé, Frank Karlitschek and friends, for the wine, and looking forward to see you next week at the ownCloud Contributor Conference here in Berlin!

The KDE Randa Meeting 2014 in retrospective

Leaving Randa after spending a week there at the KDE Randa Meeting 2014 raises mixed feelings. I am really looking forward to coming home and seeing my family, but at the same time the week was so full of action, great collaboration and awesome people that it passed by in an instant and was over so soon. Carving a work week out of the schedule for a hackfest is not an easy feat, especially during summer school break, so the expectations were high. And they have been exceeded in all aspects. A lot of the credit for that goes to the organizer, Mario Fux, and his team of local supporters. The rest goes to the awesome family of KDE contributors that make spending a week on contributing to Free Software so much fun. And of course to the sponsors of the event.

Randa is a place that grows on you. As a big city dweller, I take pride in organizing my time like clockwork, and in fitting a gazillion things into one day. I sometimes pause when crossing the bridge to Friedrichstrasse station to enjoy the view, but only for a couple of seconds. Because I got stuff to do. As soon as I boarded the Glacier Express train from Visp to Randa, the last leg of the long journey from Berlin by rail, it became obvious that I was in a different place. The train travels slowly, so slowly that sometimes wanderers keep up next to it. Later I learned that it is known as the slowest fast train of the world. It makes up for the relaxed pace with the absolutely magnificent view of the Matter valley. The view of the mountains was so breathtaking it almost made me miss the Randa stop. I arrived at the guest house, boarded a small spartanic room and then joined the group of KDE folks that already had arrived. At first, there was still this nagging feeling that whenever I was idle for 5 minutes, it meant a lack of efficiency, and something had to be done about it. And then everything changed.

The Randa panorama

One day provided enough immersion into the monastery like setting to make the feeling of time ticking and the conveyor belt constantly advancing go away. That is the moment when I was made aware again of the amazing group of people that had gathered around me to work on KDE. Not just the fact that fifty people travelled halfway around the world to create software that is free, but also what kind of wonderful kind of people they are. The attendees were a mirror image of the KDE community at large – young and old, women and men, from dozens of different countries, with all sorts of beliefs, and a unifying passion to contribute to a common good. At a time when not a day passes without news about atrocities in the name of mundane details like the whose prophet is more prophet-like, imagine such a diverse group not just spending a week together without a minute of conflict, but devoting that time to build something, and then to give it away freely without discriminating by use or user. That is the spirit of Free Software for me, and it may explain why it means more than getting stuff for free.

Two year old news
2 year old news

So we went to work. The air was fresh, and there was no distraction (not even the internet, because it broke :-) ), and we spent our days alternating between coding, talking, eating, taking walks and sleeping. A number of “special interest groups” formed rather organically, to work on educational software, the KDE SDK, porting to KDE Frameworks 5, Gluon, KDEnlive, Amarok and the KDE Frameworks Cookbook. Every day at lunch, the groups reported on their progress. As it turnes out, the velocity of the team was quite impressive, even though there were no managers. Or because, who knows. There are plenty of blog posts and details about how the work progressed on the sprint page.

Swiss slow food. Delicious.
2 year old news 2 year old news

Speaking of lunch and food in general – a small band of local supporters catered to our every whim like coffee 24 hours a day and a fridge full of FreeBeer. With an incredible supportiveness and delicious swiss cuisine they helped to make this meeting possible. While they received multiple rounds of applause, I do not think we can thank them enough. Just like the work that Mario Fux does to organize these meetings is priceless. Personally, I am hugely grateful for their commitment, which made this meeting and the previous ones possible. And I very much hope that it will for the next one, and I will do my best to be there again. See you in Randa next year!